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If you think of the great love stories—Casablanca, Gone with the Wind, Gatsby—none of them end with the boy and girl kissing and riding off into the sunset. They all share a fundamental impossibility. It can never be, but wasn’t it grand to experience? Because the one thing about intense romantic love is, good or bad, you feel very, very alive.


--Baz Luhrmann, WSJ Magazine February 2014 columnist, on love.

An adorable little message on my new daily notebook.  (Also: Poppin over Moleskine.)

An adorable little message on my new daily notebook.
(Also: Poppin over Moleskine.)

Difficulties break some men but make others. No axe is sharp enough to cut the soul of a sinner who keeps on trying, one armed with the hope that he will rise even in the end.


--Nelson Mandela, 1918 - 2013

It had been a while since I was in Boston, and I had forgotten what a beautiful city it is. You could put it in a snow globe. It is a beautiful, compact, and, of course, watery city.

I like the manageability of Boston: its size. I thought of an expression I heard about Florence, years ago. The expression is an Italian one: ‘within the hand of man.’ Florence is a city within the hand of man — walkable and all that — and so is Boston. I don’t mean to call it dinky. It’s just — manageable, a city on a human scale.


--Jay Nordlinger, “Boston Souvenirs

Some Sunday words of wisdom. Let this help jump-start another week. (via Pinterest)

Some Sunday words of wisdom. Let this help jump-start another week. (via Pinterest)

She was completely comfortable with herself. She was determined to become an editor at that point, so she did what we all do—she apprenticed. In those days, you learned at the feet of the people who knew what they were doing, and then you could do it yourself…You learn by doing, and Jackie was willing to start at the beginning.


--

Barbara Burn, on Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Jackie as Editor

On a related note…today is my first day of a ‘big girl’ job!



Do I feel beautiful? No. But I feel all sorts of other things instead, like exuberant and glamorous. Glamour is very different than beauty. Beauty, to me, is a structural, physical thing that I don’t feel I have. The rules are much stricter. Glamour is a much more inclusive and embracing thing that every woman can take part in. It doesn’t have to be vaudeville, but it’s how a certain spirit shows through, how you put yourself together, and the little touches you do.


--Poppy King, as told to Into the Gloss

Beating around the bush.

  • Me:
    I don't know how the conversation got to be so winding but that was the original point I was trying to make...
  • Friend:
    It's all good. CPAs get to bill by the hour, you're just doing your job.

You try every trick in the book to keep her. You write her letters. You drive her to work. You quote Neruda. You compose a mass e-mail disowning all your sucias. You block their e-mails. You change your phone number. You stop drinking. You stop smoking. You claim you’re a sex addict and start attending meetings. You blame your father. You blame your mother. You blame the patriarchy. You blame Santo Domingo. You find a therapist. You cancel your Facebook. You give her the passwords to all your e-mail accounts. You start taking salsa classes like you always swore you would so that the two of you could dance together. You claim that you were sick, you claim that you were weak—It was the book! It was the pressure!—and every hour like clockwork you say that you’re so so sorry. You try it all, but one day she will simply sit up in bed and say, No more, and, Ya, and you will have to move from the Harlem apartment that you two have shared. You consider not going. You consider a squat protest. In fact, you say won’t go. But in the end you do.


--Junot Díaz, This is How You Lose Her

I love finding the girl on the street whose hair is dyed bright pink, orange and blue, who’s maybe wearing a one-of-a-kind safety-pin-embellished denim jacket paired with a designer item she saved up for, like a Marc Jacobs skirt or Isabel Marant heels. To me, that’s total style and those are the women I love to photograph. It’s not about having a credit card with no limit—it’s about choosing a few pieces to splurge on every season, mixing them with a little bit of high street, some vintage, maybe a thing or two borrowed from your mom or boyfriend. When it’s thrown together, it’s amazing.


--

Candice Lake, street style photographer, as told to Lucky Magazine (Sept. 2013)

On a related note: the September issue of Lucky, presided over by the wonderful Eva Chen, is one of my favorite issues of all time—mixing/matching high/low street style is the all around focus and I could not be happier or more inspired.



I was first introduced to Humans of New York by a friend during spring of 2012. Back then, the Facebook following was around a couple thousand fans. It has ballooned to well over a million and yet the content remains as inspiring as ever. The photographer, Brandon Stanton, takes street portraits of the people of New York City with a caption of his interaction with him or her. I have cried, laughed, smiled, commiserated, and celebrated with these largely anonymous but incredibly unique personalities as I follow along with Brandon’s encounters. Recently, this photograph and story popped up on my newsfeed. As a fellow journal-writer, I connected with this person, particularly the response:
humansofnewyork:

"I write in my journal everyday." “Why’s that?” “So much happens in life, I think it’s good to live it again and get some distance from it. Or else everything is in a muddle, like on a merry-go-round.”

I was first introduced to Humans of New York by a friend during spring of 2012. Back then, the Facebook following was around a couple thousand fans. It has ballooned to well over a million and yet the content remains as inspiring as ever. The photographer, Brandon Stanton, takes street portraits of the people of New York City with a caption of his interaction with him or her. I have cried, laughed, smiled, commiserated, and celebrated with these largely anonymous but incredibly unique personalities as I follow along with Brandon’s encounters. Recently, this photograph and story popped up on my newsfeed. As a fellow journal-writer, I connected with this person, particularly the response:

humansofnewyork:

"I write in my journal everyday."
“Why’s that?”
“So much happens in life, I think it’s good to live it again and get some distance from it. Or else everything is in a muddle, like on a merry-go-round.”

The present changes the past. Looking back you do not find what you left behind.


--Kiran Desai, author (via Goodreads)

Autumn seemed to arrive suddenly that year. The morning of the first September was crisp and golden as an apple…


--J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows (via aprettypastiche)

(Source: 500-days-of-autumn)




"Perfectionists don’t consider themselves perfectionists. We just strive to make things better—and they can always be better. It’s kind of sad when you think about it. At the same time, I don’t think you can embrace imperfection because then you’re defeated. In my head, all of my characters are perfect. I have my idea of the story, and then there are the actors, with their interpretations. Later, you sit in the editing room, and it’s like a piece of clay. You carve at it until you’ve cut it down to the essential elements of the story. Eventually, the producers say, ‘Okay, it’s time to get out, we don’t have any more money.’ By the time I leave, I go, wow, that’s not what I thought it was going to be. It’s beautiful, but it’s not what was in my head."

Lee Daniels, for WSJ Magazine

Boston is small enough to feel really comfortable, but it’s full of neighborhoods to explore. Like a pop-up book, Boston is wonder contained.


--Jana Eleanor, Thought Catalog: “How to Have A Great Boston Summer


Discoveries, thoughts, travels, and inspiration on a dairly basis.